GPS asset tracker


#1

I just read the article https://www.losant.com/blog/how-we-built-the-poc-asset-tracker

It mentions the gateway that needs to be deployed to a public accessible server.
Do I need to set that up or is that something you have up and running?


#2

It’s not something we provide out-of-the-box, but it is something we do deploy and manage on behalf of customers for an additional fee.

If you choose, you can also certainly deploy the gateway to your own server that is managed by your team.


#3

Is there any further documentation for that gateway?


#4

There’s no further documentation, however that repo could use a readme.

At a high level, it’s converting the @Track Protocol, which is used by most of the Queclink asset trackers, to Losant’s MQTT protocol.

The reason it requires a gateway is because you simply point the tracker to a raw IP/Port and it connects and sends data using essentially raw TCP. The gateway runs on a small, dedicated, vm in the cloud, which provides that dedicated IP/port to connect to.


#5

Could you explain the rationale for creating three types of devices mentioned in the article? Do we need a gateway device to minimize the impact on the platform limits?

Thx


#6

@Brandon_Cannaday couldnt this separate server be avoided by going with a particle asset tracker with direct particle/losant integration? unless im missing something particles electron asset tracker also has the ability to be extended w other vehicle inputs & controls vs quelink


#7

The Particle tracker is perfect if you’re evaluating the Electron as part of a custom tracking device/solution. For the POC kits, we wanted an off-the-shelf tracker with a nice enclosure and optimized for battery life.

We also wanted to present something that a customer could immediately put into production if they chose. The Queclink trackers are FCC/CE certified. While the Electron board is certified (which helps a lot), you also have to certify the end result with the enclosure, battery, and everything.

The Electron tracker is meant to be used as an internal POC when essentially developing your own version of a Queclink tracker. When you want to sell the tracker commercially, you’d have to go through certification with the final product.


#8

Makes sense excellent points thanks